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Should we welcome Wild Boar to Uplymeís woodlands?

 
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Rhodie



Joined: 14 Sep 2005

Posts: 425
Location: Rhode Hill, Uplyme

PostPosted: 07/01/06, 10:15    Post subject: Should we welcome Wild Boar to Uplymeís woodlands? Reply with quote

With the ever increasing spread of Wild Boar in England augmented by the recent injection of numbers in Exnoor should we welcome them as an interesting and useful addition to the Uplyme fauna?

What are the pros and cons of the inevitable.

Iím sure that one future resident in the area would most welcome them, Hugh .F-W Wink
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geoff



Joined: 17 Sep 2005

Posts: 704
Location: Lyme Rd, Uplyme

PostPosted: 09/01/06, 09:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could you tell us a bit more about wild boar please Rhodie ?

Are they dangerous ?
Where do they live in the wild ?
Do they 'belong' to anyone ?
Do they do any damage ?
Can they be shot and eaten by anyone ?

Presumably they once wandered wild in the islands, so have as much right to be here as we do ?

G.
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Rhodie



Joined: 14 Sep 2005

Posts: 425
Location: Rhode Hill, Uplyme

PostPosted: 10/01/06, 23:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can I suggest that you click on the BBC listen again service at:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/aod/mainframe.shtml?http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/aod/radio4_promo.shtml

scroll down and click on: Farming Today This Week.

There you can hear last Saturdayís Farming Today programme and it is available until next Saturdayís programme. Most of the questions Geoff asked are answered there by people from either side of the fence for this seems to be a hot and controversial subject. Enter it at your own risk. Shocked

If you canít be bothered listening to the 30 minute programme or didnít go to the website in time then I shall try to answer Geoffís questions but very briefly for I am no expert.

Are they dangerous ?

Iím sure that their instinct is to keep clear of humans and the fact that they are nocturnal helps. But being quite a large animal and armed with those tusks I would not like to corner one.

Where do they live in the wild ?

I believe that they lie up in dense undergrowth in woodland during the day. At night they probably forage in the woodland for acorns and truffles! They will also go onto farmland where they can cause much damage. A French farmer in the programme said something like 60% of his maize crop was ruined. Maize apparently being one of their favourite foods.

Do they 'belong' to anyone ?

I suppose recently escaped animals still belong to the owner they escaped from. I assume captive ones would be ear tagged or something for identification and control as are pigs. As for those bred in the wild from wild parents or escaped animals I should think they belong, as foxes, deer or badgers, to no one.

Do they do any damage ?

Iíve already partly answered this above. They are particularly bad news in a garden, you think rabbits are a problem just imagine what a boar can do with that snout on finding your potato and root veg beds.

Can they be shot and eaten by anyone ?


Yes provided you have the landowners permission. There are no restriction on what weapons may be used in hunting them although it is thought that .22 rifles would injure rather than kill the animal. Neither are there any close seasons. Of course, as with other domestic and wild animals, it is illegal to inflict unnecessary suffering on them.

Apparently they became extinct in this country some three centuries ago. I find it difficult to understand how this came about with such a retiring and elusive creature for it is now said that if the wild population gets much bigger then controlling the animalís numbers would become very difficult if not impossible.

Could we see in a few years time a salvation for the hunting classes. Perhaps we can envisage a future in which the unspeakable chases the extremely edible. Wink

Hitting one on the road could result in some serious damage but the resulting road kill would not be left for the crows. Very Happy

If your appetite, for information stupid, has been aroused have a look at the following websites. The 50/60 page pdf file is particularly informative. For instance there is a map showing where the two main wild breeding populations are located and it shows that they are almost on our doorstep Surprised

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/4569996.stm

http://www.defra.gov.uk/wildlife-countryside/vertebrates/wild-boar.htm#damage

http://www.defra.gov.uk/corporate/consult/wild-boar/wildboar-status.pdf

They are closer than you think Laughing
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geoff



Joined: 17 Sep 2005

Posts: 704
Location: Lyme Rd, Uplyme

PostPosted: 11/01/06, 09:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the information Rhodie. Very interesting.

Rhodie wrote:
...Perhaps we can envisage a future in which the unspeakable chases the extremely edible. Wink


Laughing
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